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Sustainability Metrics


Resources & Downloads
Sustainability Metrics

  • Certain figures in the following tables have been restated from previous sustainability reports to reflect new information or changes to tracking systems and/or reporting practices.
  • All currency-related values are reported in Canadian dollars, except for community investment numbers and initiatives, which are reported in Canadian and U.S. dollars.
 

About CP

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Scale of the organization

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Direct economic value generated and distributed

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Economic Impact Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Economic Value Generated
Total Revenues1 $ Millions 6,712 6,232 6,554 7,316 7,792
Canadian Entities $ Millions 4,662 4,473 4,667 5,232 5,675
U.S. Entities $ Millions 2,050 1,759 1,887 2,084 2,117
Economic Value Distributed
Total Operating Expenses2 $ Millions 4,094 3,821 4,035 4,485 4,668
Canadian Entities $ Millions 2,898 2,706 2,816 3,199 3,314
U.S. Entities $ Millions 1,196 1,115 1,219 1,286 1,354
Compensation & Benefits3 $ Millions 1,441 1,356 1,309 1,468 1,540
Capital Expenditures4 $ Millions 1,536 1,205 1,366 1,574 1,664
Payments to Providers of Capital5 $ Millions 3,306 1,932 1,121 1,890 1,964
Payments to Government6 $ Millions 279 438 546 442 639
Operational Metrics
Revenue Ton-Miles7 Millions 145,257 135,952 142,540 154,207 154,378
Gross Ton-Miles8 Millions 263,344 242,694 252,195 275,362 280,724
Carloads Transported Thousands 2,628 2,525 2,634 2,740 2,766
Intermodal Units Transported Thousands 972 976 997 1,026 1,046
Train Miles Travelled Thousands 34,064 30,373 30,632 32,312 32,924

Employees

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Information on employees and other workers

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Occupational health and safety management system

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Average hours of training per year per employee

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Workforce Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Total Workforce9 Total Number 12,938 11,738 12,294 12,866 12,732
Total Employees10 # Employees 12,856 11,693 12,215 12,840 12,694
Canada # Employees 9,808 9,010 9,476 10,021 9,923
U.S. # Employees 3,048 2,683 2,739 2,819 2,771
Women # Employees 1,226 1,106 1,167 1,222 1,227
Men # Employees 11,630 10,587 11,048 11,618 11,467
Unionized Employees # Employees 9,596 8,760 9,173 9,618 9,390
Non-Unionized Employees # Employees 3,260 2,933 3,042 3,222 3,304
Total Full-Time Employees11 # Employees 12,776 11,661 12,173 12,782 12,643
Women # Full-Time Employees 1,207 1,100 1,157 1,215 1,220
Men # Full-Time Employees 11,569 10,561 11,016 11,567 11,423
Total Temporary Employees12 # Employees 71 23 41 57 49
Women # Temp Employees 13 4 9 6 6
Men # Temp Employees 58 19 32 51 43
Total Part-Time Employees13 # Employees 9 9 1 1 2
Women # Part-Time Employees 6 2 1 1 1
Men # Part-Time Employees 3 7 0 0 1
Total Contractors14 Total Number 82 45 79 26 38
Training15
Training – Union Staff Avg. Hours /Employee 33 28 40 41 65
Training – Non-Union Staff Avg. Hours /Employee 32 30 49 67 55
Total Training Cost16 $ Millions 44.9 29.9 33.9 51.2 58.5
Average Spend on Training per Full-Time Employee16 $ 3,499 2,565 2,786 4,006 4,657

Governance & Ethics

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Governance structure

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Composition of the highest governance body and its committees

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Diversity of governance bodies and employees

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Board of Directors Composition17 Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Number of Directors # Directors 8 10 9 10 11
Percent Independence18 % Directors 75.0 80.0 88.9 90.0 90.9
Average Age Years 58 60 60 61 61
Average Tenure Years 2.6 2.4 2.6 3.5 3.6
Canada19 % Directors 50.0 60.0 55.6 50.0 54.5
U.S.19 % Directors 50.0 40.0 44.4 50.0 45.5
Visible Minorities  % Directors 0.0 0.0 11.1 10.0 9.1
Women % Directors 25.0 40.0 44.4 40.0 45.5
Men  % Directors 75.0 60.0 55.6 60.0 54.5
Under 30 Years Old  % Directors 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
30–50 Years Old  % Directors 37.5 20.0 22.2 20.0 9.1
Over 50 Years Old  % Directors 62.5 80.0 77.8 80.0 90.9
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Communication and training about anti-corruption policies and procedures

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Ethics Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
CP Code of Business Ethics Training20 # Employees 2,686 2,665 2,773 2,969 3,202
Alert Line Calls21 Total Number 20 30 19 22 28
1 Canadian Entities refers to Canadian Pacific. U.S. Entities refers to SOO Line, DM&E and D&H. Total Revenues includes all freight and non-freight revenue. Freight revenues are generated from goods or property transported. Non-freight revenues are generated from leasing certain assets; other arrangements, including logistical services and contracts with passenger service operators; and switching fees.
2 Expenses for Canadian Entities refers to Canadian Pacific. Expenses for U.S. Entities refers to SOO Line, DM&E and D&H. Changes in freight volumes generally contribute to corresponding changes in freight revenues and certain variable expenses, such as fuel, equipment rents and crew costs.
3 Compensation & Benefits includes employee wages, salaries, fringe benefits and stock-based compensation. 2016 and 2017 comparative year figures have been restated for the retrospective adoption of ASU 2017-07.
4 Capital Expenditures are additions to properties. Capital Expenditures includes but is not limited to enhancements to track infrastructure, investments in locomotives and freight cars, and information systems. CP incurs expenditures to expand and enhance its rail network, rolling stock and other infrastructure. These expenditures are aimed at improving efficiency and safety of our operations. Such investments are also an integral part of the Company’s multi-year capital program and support growth initiatives.
5 Payments to Providers of Capital includes dividends paid to shareholders, interest paid to shareholders, interest paid to debtholders and payments for share repurchases less issuance of shares.
6 Payments to Government includes income tax paid and property tax.
7 Revenue Ton-Miles (RTMs) refers to the movement of one revenue-producing ton of freight over a distance of one mile. RTMs measure the relative weight and distance of rail freight moved by the Company.
8 Gross Ton-Miles (GTMs) refers to the movement of one ton of train weight over a distance of one mile. GTMs are calculated by multiplying total train weight by the distance the train moved. Total train weight comprises the weight of the freight cars, their contents and any inactive locomotives. An increase in GTMs indicates additional workload.
9 Total Workforce includes total employees plus contractors and consultants as at Dec. 31 of each reporting year. 2019 figure includes Transcare Logistics Corporation ("Transcare") employees and Central Maine and Québec Railway Canada Inc. (“CMQ Canada”) employees. Periods before 2019 were recast to include Transcare Logistics Corporation employees.

10 Total Employees refers to individuals currently engaged in full-time, part-time or fixed-term employment with CP. The count is based on total number of employees as at Dec. 31 of the reporting year. Decrease of total employees between 2015–2016 is primarily due to strong operational performance, natural attrition and efficient resource management planning. Total employees in 2019 includes Transcare employees and CMQ Canada employees. Periods before 2019 were recast to include Transcare Logistics Corporation employees.

11 Full-Time Employees refers to individuals who work more than 90 percent of the full 40-hour workweek.

12 Total Temporary Employees refers to seasonal or fixed-term individuals. All temporary employees were located in Canada during the reporting period.
13 Total Part-Time Employees refers to individuals who work between 50–90 percent of the full 40-hour workweek. All part-time employees are located in Canada.
14 CP does not currently monitor workforce-related metrics for contractors.
15 Training Hours include training related to in-class training provided by internal trainers, CP’s web-based learning management system, external consultants. Hours do not include field based or on-the-job employee training. 
16 Training Costs include expenses related to the management of CP’s Training, and Learning and Development departments, costs for internal trainers, CP’s web-based learning management system, external consultants, online learning platforms such as Harvard ManageMentor, and compensation for employee time while training. Costs do not include field based or on-the-job employee training.
17 Board of Directors Composition is reported as of Dec. 31 for all reporting years.
18 The Board has adopted standards for director independence based on criteria of the New York Stock Exchange, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and Canadian Securities Administrators. The Board annually conducts, through a combination of questionnaires, biographical reviews and discussions, a comprehensive assessment of all business and other relationships and interests of each director vis-à-vis the Corporation and its subsidiaries, and has determined that each director, except for Keith Creel, is independent of the Corporation in accordance with the standards for independence established by the NYSE and NI 58-101 Disclosure of Governance Practices, and that each member of the CP Audit and Finance Committee meets the additional independence standards established for Audit Committee members under Section 10A(m)(3) and Rule 10A-3(b)(1) of the Exchange Act and NI 52-110 Audit Committees. Keith Creel is not independent by virtue of the fact that he is President and Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation. Prior to July 2019, the Audit and Finance Committee were separate committees.
19 Canada and U.S. metrics are calculated based on each director’s country of residence.
20 The figures presented represent training completed by non-unionized employees; however, the Code of Business Ethics (the “Code”) applies to everyone at CP and its subsidiaries: directors, officers, employees (unionized and non-unionized) and contractors who do work for CP. Unionized employees are provided with a copy of the Code every three years. In 2019, unionized employees were mailed a copy of the Code. Directors must also confirm annually that they have complied with the Code. The Code is part of the terms and conditions of employment for non-unionized employees, and contractors must agree to follow principles of standards of business conduct consistent with those set out in our Code as part of the terms of engagement. CP Code of Business Ethics Training covers CP employees only and is not inclusive of Transcare employees and CMQ Canada employees (acquired in December 2019).
21 CP’s independently managed Alert Line (A-Line) is a tool that allows employees to report an instance directly to their manager or anonymously. All employees are obligated to report any known or suspected violations of the Code, or any instance that may violate CP’s commitments to ethics and integrity. A-Line is available 24/7 by phone or online to all employees and stakeholders. Translation services are available as well if required. All reports to A-Line are handled confidentially and investigated in accordance with CP’s Business Ethics Reporting Policy.

Safety

Safety Culture1

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Work-related injuries

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Work-Related Injury2,3 Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Hours Worked Thousands 31,414 26,779 26,828 28,151 30,300
Total Recordable Injury Rate4 Injury Rate 3.27 3.10 3.25 3.14 2.67
FRA Personal Injury Rate Frequency5 Injury Rate 1.84 1.67 1.65 1.48 1.42
Women Injury Rate * 0.00 1.40 0.92 0.93
Men Injury Rate * 1.75 1.65 1.52 1.47
Contractors6 # FRA Injuries * 26 30 34 20
Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate7
(per 200,000 employee hours worked)
Injury Rate * * 1.12 0.97 0.90
Canada Injury Rate * * 1.00 0.87 0.82
U.S. Injury Rate * * 1.53 1.37 1.23
Women Injury Rate * * 0.86 0.67 0.56
Men Injury Rate * * 1.15 1.00 0.93
Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate
(per 1,000,000 employee hours worked)
Injury Rate * * 5.59 4.87 4.49
Canada Injury Rate * * 3.91 3.48 3.30
U.S. Injury Rate * * 1.68 1.39 1.19
Women Injury Rate * * 4.32 3.37 2.75
Men Injury Rate * * 5.73 5.02 4.67
Representation by Health & Safety Committee % Employees 100 100 100 100 100
Fatalities Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Employee Fatalities8 # Fatalities 0 1 2 3 4
Contract Worker Fatalities # Fatalities 1 1 1 0 0

Public Safety & Emergency Preparedness

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540a.1 Number of accidents and incidents

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Train Accidents Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Train-Related Incidents and Accidents9 # Accidents 768 601 638 670 694
FRA Train Accident10 # Accidents 53 37 33 39 38
Train vs. Vehicle Fatalities11 # Accidents 6 4 10 9 8
Train vs. Vehicle Injuries12 # Accidents 33 28 29 17 26
Train-related Accidents Involving the Release of Hazardous Materials13 # Accidents 3 1 2 3 5
Non-Accident Releases of Hazardous Materials14 # Releases 21 23 12 24 17
Grade Crossing Accident Rate15 # Accidents/Million Train Miles 2.47 2.81 2.60 2.73 2.58
FRA Train Accident Rate16 # Accidents/Million Train Miles 1.41 1.12 0.99 1.10 1.06
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Significant spills

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Significant Spills Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Spill Events17 # Spills 27 37 21 34 35

* CP launched Case Management Application in 2017. This safety management tool has improved our ability to effectively manage critical safety information and conduct deeper trend analysis. Data prior to 2017 for some of these metrics categories is not readily available.

Safety Culture data covers CP employees only and is not inclusive of Transcare employees and CMQ Canada employees (acquired in December 2019).
2 In 2018, CP continued to focus on its Home Safe initiative to improve overall communications and hazard identification amongst all workers. The integration of Home Safe into the CP safety culture has demonstrated positive results as evidenced by the 2018 personal injury rate. In 2019, the initiative has expanded in scope to include safe practices in the home. CP also implemented its critical safety rules initiative, designed to increase awareness and compliance of critical tasks that can lead to catastrophic events.
3 Certain statistical highlights and safety indicators figures have been updated to reflect new information or have been revised to comply with current presentation.
4 Total Recordable Injury Rate (TRIR) is a measure of recordable injuries resulting from a discernable work-related event, to an on-duty employee and is a physical injury in nature (not incident stress or psychological in nature); including fatalities. TRIR is calculated as total number of recordable cases multiplied by 200,000, divided by total employee hours worked during the reporting period. Recordable incidents include all safety-related events reported by employees regardless of incident severity.
5 The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Personal Injury Rate Frequency (PIRF) reflects the number of personal injuries, multiplied by 200,000, divided by total employee hours. PIRF is limited to personal injuries that require employees to lose time away from work, modify their normal duties or obtain medical treatment beyond minor first aid. PIRF employee hours are the total hours worked, excluding vacation and sick time, by all employees, excluding contractors.
6 CP does not track contractor hours; therefore, CP cannot calculate a total recordable work-related injuries rate.
7 Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR) reflects an injury that results in calendar days away from work, as recommended by a physician. LTIFR is calculated as total number of injuries that result in an employee losing time away from work, multiplied by 200,000 or 1,000,000, divided by total man-hours worked during the reporting period.
8 Fatalities covers CP employees and Contractors only; data is not available for Transcare employees and CMQ Canada employees (acquired in December 2019).
9 Train-Related Incidents and Accidents refers to any event that causes damage to mobile on-track equipment during the course of railway operations.
10 Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Train Accident refers to a subset of reported train-related incidents and includes only those events involving damage meeting or exceeding a specific monetary value set by the FRA. For 2017–2019, this value was US$10,700 and US$10,500 in damage for events occurring from 2015–2016.
11 Train vs. Vehicle Fatalities refers to incidents involving train and road vehicle collisions that result in a fatality.
12 Train vs. Vehicle Injuries refers to incidents involving train and vehicle collisions that result in an injury.
13 Train-Related Accidents Involving the Release of Hazardous Materials refers to incidents involving the release of hazardous materials (U.S.) or dangerous goods (Canada) from a means of containment during transportation by train.
14 Non-accident Release of Hazardous Materials refers to an unintentional release of hazardous materials (U.S.) or dangerous goods (Canada) from a means of containment during transportation. These events do not involve a train-related accident and can result from equipment failure or improperly secured materials.
15 Grade Crossing Accident Rate refers to any impact between on-track railway equipment and a highway user at a highway-rail grade crossing. Highway-rail grade crossing means: (1) a location where a public highway, road, street or private roadway, including associated sidewalks, crosses one or more railway tracks at grade; or (2) a location where a pathway explicitly authorized by a public authority or a railway carrier (dedicated for the use of non-vehicular traffic, including pedestrians, bicyclists and others), not associated with a public highway, road, street or private roadway, crosses one or more railway tracks at grade.
16 Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Train Accident Rate reflects the number of train accidents resulting in damage meeting or exceeding a specific monetary threshold (set by FRA), multiplied by 1,000,000, divided by total train miles travelled during the reporting period. Monetary threshold for 2017–2019 was US$10,700 and US$10,500 in damage for events occurring from 2015–2016.
17 Spill Events includes all reported incidents involving CP employees or contractors, which result in the unintentional release of hazardous materials or materials, which may adversely impact the environment. Spills include events involving an accidental release, spill or leak, or result from the failure of means of containment. Reported values are limited to significant releases where a material has been released in excess of local regulatory reporting thresholds. 

Operational Excellence

Energy Efficiency & Emissions

Locomotive Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Total Locomotive Fuel Million U.S. Gallons 264 238 248 263 270
Million Litres 998 903 939 995 1,023
Locomotive Fuel Efficiency U.S. Gallons/1,000 GTMs 0.999 0.980 0.980 0.953 0.955
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Energy consumption within the organization

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Energy intensity

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Reduction of energy consumption

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Energy Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Total Energy Consumption1 1,000 MWh 11,539 10,401 10,758 11,384 11,625
Locomotive Diesel 1,000 MWh 10,558 9,548 9,939 10,533 10,745
Locomotive – Renewable Fuels2 1,000 MWh 158 147 149 157 163
Other Liquid Fuels3 1,000 MWh 422 406 357 364 373
Natural Gas and Propane 1,000 MWh 168 117 128 139 150
Electricity Consumption 1,000 MWh 232 183 185 192 194
Energy Costs $ Millions 731 591 702 945 908
Energy Intensity – Total Company kWh/1,000 GTM 43.8 42.9 42.7 41.3 41.4
Energy Intensity – Locomotive Fuel kWh/1,000 GTM 40.7 39.9 40.0 38.8 38.9

Note: Effective for the 2019 reporting year, CP has completed a detailed inventory and evaluation of all Scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions relevant to the company’s value chain. In previous years, reporting on Scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions was limited to Business Travel. This change in reporting practice has resulted in a deeper understanding of the CP’s emissions footprint and a significant change in reported Scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions starting in 2019.

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Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions

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Indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions

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Other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions

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GHG emissions intensity

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Reduction of GHG emissions

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Nitrogen oxides (NOX), sulfur oxides (SOX), and other significant air emissions

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Emissions Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Total Direct & Indirect Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions: Scope 1 and 24 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e 3,146 2,850 2,931 3,102 3,179 
Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e 3,094 2,797 2,883 3,052 3,130 
Locomotive 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e 2,953 2,671 2,771 2,936 3,013 
Other Scope 15 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e 141 126 112 116 117 
Direct (Scope 1) GHG Emissions6
CO2  1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e 2,818.52 2,549.43 2,628.91 2,782.71 2,851.98
CH4  1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e 4.50 3.98 4.14 4.38 4.50
N2 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e 269.97 243.67 249.82 264.68 273.87
HFC  1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e 0.26 0.09 0.04 0.08 0.08
Indirect Emissions Scope 2 & 3
Indirect (Scope 2) GHG Emissions7 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e 52 53 48 50 49
Other Indirect (Scope 3) GHG Emissions8 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e * * * * 1,734
Purchased Goods & Services and Capital Goods9 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e * * * * 631
Fuel and Energy-Related Activities10 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2 * * * * 917
Upstream Transportation and Distribution11 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2 * * * * 142
Waste Generated in Operations12 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2 * * * * 5
Business Travel13  1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2 20 17 16 16 21
Employee Commuting14  1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2 * * * * 18
GHG Emissions Intensity15 Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Company (Scope 1 and 2) kg CO2e/1,000 GTMs 11.9 11.7 11.6 11.3 11.3 
Locomotive (Scope 1) kg CO2e/1,000 GTMs 11.2 11.0 11.0 10.7 10.7 
Company (Scope 1 and 2) kg CO2e/1,000 GTKs 8.2 8.0 8.0 7.7 7.8
Locomotive (Scope 1) kg CO2e/1,000 GTKs 7.7 7.5 7.5 7.3 7.4
Company (Scope 1 and 2) kg CO2e/1,000 RTMs 21.7 21.0 20.6 20.1 20.6
Locomotive (Scope 1) kg CO2e/1,000 RTMs 20.3 19.6 19.4 19.0 19.5
Company (Scope 1 and 2) kg CO2e/1,000 RTKs 14.8 14.4 14.1 13.8 14.1
Locomotive (Scope 1) kg CO2e/1,000 RTKs 13.9 13.5 13.3 13.0 13.4
Revenue (Scope 1 and 2) Metric Tons CO2e/$ Million Revenue 469 457 447 424 408 
Employee (Scope 1 and 2)16 Kg CO2e/Employee 241 240 237 239 249 
Locomotive Air Emissions17 Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Nitrous oxide (NOx) kilotonnes 37.91 31.73 33.05 34.52 35.00
Sulfur oxide (SOx) kilotonnes 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02
Particulate matter (PM) kilotonnes 0.81 0.67 0.66 0.70 0.69
Hydrocarbons  kilotonnes 1.78 1.45 1.43 1.51 1.44
Carbon monoxide (CO) kilotonnes 7.35 6.55 6.81 7.17 7.06

Asset & Rail Network Resiliency

Performance Metrics Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Average Terminal Dwell Hours 7.2 6.7 6.6 6.8 6.4
Average Train Speed Miles per Hour 21.4 23.5 22.6 21.5 22.2
Main Track Inspections18 Total Number 87,722 81,425 81,408 83,832 86,723
Main Track Miles Inspected Total Number 1,790,967 1,626,119 1,677,032 1,793,249 1,855,173
Total Main Track Miles Total Number 12,559 12,423 12,489 12,469 12,683

Environmental Footprint

Environmental Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Annual Spend on Remediation $ Millions 17 12 8 7 7
Provision for Environmental Remediation Programs19 $ Millions 93 85 78 82 77
Environmental Audits Completed # Audits 7 4 14 9 10
Number of Environmental Fines # Fines 0 0 0 1 0
Amount of Environmental Fines20 $ Total Spent 0 0 0 31,500 0
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Water consumption

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Water Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Water Consumption21 ML 1,468 535 557 503 606
Water Discharge22 ML 99 110 110 84 134
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Waste by type and disposal method

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Hazardous Waste Disposal23 Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Total Hazardous Waste Metric Tonnes 3,213 1,742 1,758 2,623 3,274 
Reuse Metric Tonnes 0 0 0 0
Recycled Metric Tonnes 3,137 1,303 1,426 2,588 2,715 
Compost Metric Tonnes 0 0 0 0 0.1 
Recovery, including energy recovery Metric Tonnes 0 1 0 0
Incineration Metric Tonnes 0 14 2 2
Deep well injection Metric Tonnes 0 0 0.40 0.02
Landfill Metric Tonnes 76 84 21 16
On-site Storage Metric Tonnes 0 5.08 0 0.03
Fuel Blending Metric Tonnes 0 334 308 17 554

 

Non-hazardous Waste Disposal Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Total Non-hazardous Waste Metric Tonnes 109,907 92,125 77,511 101,702 86,838
Reuse Metric Tonnes 0 0 0 0 0
Recycled Metric Tonnes 2,527 1,794 9,197 2,268 2,164
Compost Metric Tonnes 59 103 65 55 34
Recovery, including energy recovery Metric Tonnes 99,678 83,120 61,766 92,950 77,755
Incineration Metric Tonnes 0 0 0 0 0
Deep well injection Metric Tonnes 0 0 0 0 0
Landfill Metric Tonnes 7,644 7,066 6,483 6,429 6,885
On-site Storage Metric Tonnes 0 0 0 0 0
Fuel Blending Metric Tonnes 0 42 0 0 0
Other Waste Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Rail Ties Sent to Cogeneration Facility # Ties 1,206,751 1,006,280 747,774 1,125,619 941,615
Rail Ties Sent to Cogeneration Facility24 Metric Tonnes 99,678 83,072 61,732 92,976 77,755
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Materials used by weight or volume

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Resource Consumption Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Total Steel Products Purchased Metric Tonnes 115,583 88,434 71,251 73,101 81,591
New Rail Purchases Metric Tonnes 91,583 68,972 47,289 51,293 60,741
Other Track Materials25 Metric Tonnes 24,525 19,462 23,962 21,808 20,849
Total Rail Ties Installed 1,000s Rail Ties 1,009 1,008 1,138 1,015 1,122

Supply Chain Management

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Proportion of spending on local suppliers

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Supply Chain Management Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Number of Suppliers26 # Suppliers 10,141 9,147 9,427 8,981 9,812
Total Supplier Spend $ Millions 3,940 3,132 3,555 4,042 4,269
Spending on Local Suppliers – Canada $ Millions 2,101 1,659 1,896 2,234 2,406
Spending on Local Suppliers – U.S. $ Millions 1,837 1,471 1,624 1,696 1,850
1 Total Energy Consumption includes all liquefied gas, fuel and electricity consumed inside the organization during the reporting year.
2 All diesel fuel supplied to the Canadian marketplace must contain an annual average of 2 percent renewable content. Locomotive – Renewable Fuel is estimated to be equivalent to 2 percent of all locomotive diesel fuel consumed in Canada during the reporting year.
3 Other Liquid Fuel includes all liquid and gaseous fuel, excluding locomotive diesel, consumed by the organization during the reporting period. Common fuel reported here includes gasoline, diesel, heating oil and liquid biofuels.

Values reflect a combined total of Scope 1 or Direct GHG emissions from CP owned or controlled sources (primarily locomotives for CP) and Scope 2 or Indirect GHG emissions from the generation of purchased energy (CP’s electricity consumption). Scope 3 GHG emissions relating to Business Travel is no longer aggregated with Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG Emissions. Scope 3 GHG emissions from Business Travel is now reported separately.

5 Other Scope 1 GHG emissions includes, GHG emissions related to off-road vehicles, vehicle fleet, work equipment and stationary sources such as propane and natural gas for heating facilities.
6 Direct (Scope 1) GHG Emissions are calculated following The Greenhouse Gas Protocol: A Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard (Revised Edition). Total gas emissions are presented as 1,000 Metric Tonnes CO2e and have been converted following global warming potentials factors from IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5).
7 Indirect (Scope 2) GHG Emissions consists of emissions from electricity. Canadian emissions are based on emissions factors used for Canada’s National Inventory Report. U.S. emissions are based on the U.S. EPA eGRID 2018 emissions factors. Electricity usage is based on electric utility billing data.
8 Prior to 2019, CP's reporting on Scope 3 GHG emissions was limited to Business Travel. Beginning in 2019, CP expanded GHG reporting to include additional relevant Scope 3 emissions categories of purchased goods & services and capital goods, fuel and energy-related activities, upstream transportation and distribution, and waste generated in operations for 2019. The asterisk (*) indicates that a reporting of these categories of Other Indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions relevant to CP is not available for earlier reporting periods.
9 An estimate of GHG emissions related to Purchased Goods & Services and Capital Goods was derived following an economic input-output (EIO) model developed by Carnegie Mellon University. EIO categories by spend were totaled and converted into GHG emissions using factors consistent with this approach.
10 Fuel and Energy-Related Activities includes upstream emissions associated with the fuel that CP uses to operate, from fuel combusted for generation of electricity purchased by CP and transmission and distribution losses from electricity consumed.
11 GHG emissions related to the transport of purchased material, truck transport of intermodal containers, and postage and couriers. Emissions from transport of purchased material were calculated using each order's weight and transport distance with tonne-mileage emissions factors for trucks. For all other Upstream Transportation and Distribution, an economic input-output (EIO) calculator was used to estimate emissions from purchased transportation services.
12 GHG emissions associated with annual waste generated by CP. Derived using factors from the U.S. EPA Center for Corporate Climate Leadership.
13 Emissions for Business Travel, including hotel stays, vehicle rentals and flights. Emissions factors for hotel stays from DEFRA were used to calculate GHG emissions. Emissions factors for vehicle rentals and passenger flights from the U.S. EPA Center for Corporate Climate Leadership were used to calculate GHG emissions.
14 Employee Commuting emissions were estimated using average commuting time, transportation mode and distance statistics from census data in the U.S. and Canada. GHG emissions were calculated following emissions factors from the U.S. EPA Center for Corporate Climate Leadership. Emissions related to employee commuting covers CP employees only and is not inclusive of Transcare and CMQ employees.
15 GHG Emissions Intensity values presented here represent those most commonly presented or publicly requested within the freight rail sector. Company GHG Emissions Intensity includes total Scope 1 and 2 emissions divided by gross ton-miles (GTMs), gross tonne-kilometres (GTKs), revenue ton-miles (RTMs) or revenue tonne-kilometres (RTKs) during the reporting period. Intensity metrics have also been provided specific to locomotive GHG emissions.
16 CP Employee Emissions Intensity covers CP employees only and is not inclusive of Transcare employees and CMQ Canada employees (acquired in December 2019).
17 Locomotive Air Emissions represents common contaminants associated with the combustion of fuel by CP’s locomotive fleet. Calculations are specific to each locomotives’ corresponding EPA emissions tier class. Air emissions are derived by combining CP active locomotive fleet data with EPA tier class emissions factors, total fuel consumed and nature of locomotive use (line haul or switching). This methodology is consistent with practices of the Canadian rail sector and Railway Association of Canada – Locomotive Emissions Monitoring Program.

18 Main Track Inspections includes both regulatory and special track inspections.

19 Provision for Environmental Remediation Programs represents an estimate of probable future obligation and includes both asserted and unasserted claims, without reduction for anticipated recoveries from third parties. Although the recorded accruals include CP’s best estimate of all probable costs, CP’s total environmental remediation costs cannot be predicted with certainty. Accruals for environmental remediation may change periodically as new information about previously untested sites becomes known, environmental laws and regulations evolve, and advances are made in environmental remediation technology.

20 The environmental penalty in 2018 was an administrative penalty for exceeding permit limits.

21 Water Consumption volumes are based on metered service connections to municipal water treatment and distribution systems supplied to CP facilities across the network. These values do not reflect a small amount of unmetered water supplied by local wells at remote operating locations.

22 CP discharges industrial wastewater in a responsible manner according to local regulations and permits. All wastewater discharges are planned. Where applicable, CP processes industrial wastewater through treatment plants, including oil water separators, dissolved air flotation, chemical injection and activated carbon systems. Treated effluent is typically discharged to publicly owned sewage treatment works for further treatment. Currently, treated effluent from CP wastewater treatment plants is not reused for other purposes. CP does not currently report on water discharge quality.

23 Definitions of hazardous and non-hazardous waste are aligned with Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal. Waste disposal methods and associated quantities are provided to CP by third party waste disposal contractors, and tracked by CP’s third party consultant. CP works collaboratively with our third party waste contractors to identify beneficial reuse and recycling options for CP’s industrial waste streams.

24 Annual volumes of rail ties sent to cogeneration facilities are also included in the non-hazardous waste disposal table, reported as waste sent for recovery, including energy recovery.

25 Other Track Materials includes anchors, spikes, screw spikes, rail clip fasteners, tie plates and track bolts.

26 Tier 1 Suppliers refers to suppliers that have received a direct payment from CP in the reporting year regardless of a payment amount or volume.

Social Impact

Diversity & Inclusion

405-1
Diversity of governance bodies and employees

405-1
Employee Composition1 Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Gender
Women  % Employees 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.5 9.7
Men  % Employees 90.5 90.5 90.4 90.5 90.3
Age
Under 30 Years Old  % Employees 14.5 14.0 16.2 17.9 17.1
30–50 Years Old  % Employees 53.7 55.3 55.5 56.5 58.2
Over 50 Years Old  % Employees 31.8 30.7 28.3 25.6 24.7
Gender & Age by Management Level
Sr. Executive Management2 # Employees 79 74 78 88 88
Women % Sr. Exec. Mgmt. 11.4 14.9 17.9 18.2 17.0
Men % Sr. Exec. Mgmt. 88.6 85.1 82.1 81.8 83.0
Under 30 Years Old  % Sr. Exec. Mgmt. 1.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
30–50 Years Old  % Sr. Exec. Mgmt. 54.4 59.5 65.4 63.6 61.4
Over 50 Years Old % Sr. Exec. Mgmt. 44.3 40.5 34.6 36.4 38.6
Management3 # Employees 2,509 2,301 2,389 2,541 2,615
Women % Mgmt. 17.6 18.4 18.7 18.3 18.2
Men % Mgmt. 82.4 81.6 81.3 81.7 81.8
Under 30 Years Old % Mgmt. 7.6 7.7 8.1 8.4 8.0
30–50 Years Old  % Mgmt. 60.6 62.9 64.4 65.0 66.7
Over 50 Years Old % Mgmt. 31.8 29.4 27.5 26.6 25.3
Non-Management—Non-union4 # Employees 672 558 575 593 601
Women % Non-mgmt. Non-union  42.1 41.4 39.1 37.3 37.4
Men % Non-mgmt. Non-union  57.9 58.6 60.9 62.7 62.6
Under 30 Years Old % Non-mgmt. Non-union  13.2 11.5 17.6 19.1 18.5
30–50 Years Old  % Non-mgmt. Non-union  58.2 59.2 54.6 54.6 56.9
Over 50 Years Old % Non-mgmt. Non-union  28.6 29.3 27.8 26.3 24.6
Non-Management—Union5 # Employees 9,596 8,760 9,173 9,618 9,390
Women % Non-mgmt. Union  5.2 5.1 5.3 5.5 5.4
Men % Non-mgmt. Union  94.8 94.9 94.7 94.5 94.6
Under 30 Years Old % Non-mgmt. Union  16.4 16.0 18.4 20.5 19.8
30–50 Years Old  % Non-mgmt. Union  51.7 53.0 53.2 54.4 55.9
Over 50 Years Old % Non-mgmt. Union  31.9 31.0 28.4 25.1 24.3
Other Diversity Metrics6
Canada
Women % Cdn Employees 10.7 10.6 10.7 10.8 11.0 
Aboriginal7 % Cdn Employees 3.3 3.4 4.0 4.2 4.5 
Persons with Disabilities8 % Cdn Employees 2.6 3.0 2.7 2.4 2.8 
Visible Minorities9 % Cdn Employees 8.4 8.5 10.3 11.8 12.8 
U.S.
Women % U.S. Employees 5.6 5.3 5.3 4.8  5.0
Persons with Disabilities8  % U.S. Employees 1.4 1.4 1.2 1.6 1.6 
Visible Minorities9 % U.S. Employees 11.5 11.3 12.5 12.5 11.8 
401-1
New employee hires and employee turnover

401-1
New Hires10 Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Applications Received # Applicants 40,370 43,722 62,341 106,765 92,807
Total Positions Hired # Positions 1,799 1,775 3,160 4,181 3,871
New Hires  # Employees 1,233 674 1,657 2,402 1,756
Internal Hires11 # Employees 566 1,101 1,503 1,779 2,115
Rate of Internal Hires % Total Positions Hired 31.5 62.0 47.6 42.5 54.6
Gender
Women  % New Employees 10.1 13.8 11.3 9.6 11.2
Men  % New Employees 89.9 86.2 88.7 90.4 88.8
Age
Under 30 Years Old  % New Employees 45.5 42.1 47.4 44.7 52.6
30–50 Years Old  % New Employees 47.8 50.3 45.0 48.3 41.5
Over 50 Years Old  % New Employees 6.7 7.6 7.6 7.0 6.0
Region
Canada  % New Employees 70.6 82.2 80.9 78.6 86.0
U.S.  % New Employees 29.4 17.8 19.1 21.4 14.0
Employee Turnover12  Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Total Employee Turnover13 # Employees 2,537 2,146 1,729 1,785 1,705
Employee Turnover Rate14 % Total Employees 19.8 18.4 14.2 14.0 13.6
Voluntary Employee Turnover Rate15 % Total Employees 8.2 7.7 6.5 7.0 7.0
Gender Turnover Rate
Women  % Female Employees 18.8 17.7 13.6 15.7 15.3
Men  % Male Employees 19.9 18.5 14.3 13.8 13.4
Turnover Rate by Age
Under 30 Years Old  % Age Class 23.2 16.6 12.8 16.4 19.1
30–50 Years Old  % Age Class 13.5 13.0 10.4 10.0 8.9
Over 50 Years Old  % Age Class 27.6 27.6 21.5 20.0 20.7
Turnover Rate by Region
Canada  % Regional Employees 19.1 18.2 14.2 13.7 13.7
United States  % Regional Employees 21.9 19.3 14.2 15.2 13.2

Community Investment

 Investments and Donations Units 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 
Canada
Community Investments by CP $ CAD 4,007,200 4,807,029 4,604,679 4,000,947 3,531,458
Monetary Donations by CP $ CAD 3,727,100 4,494,260 4,470,664 3,617,418 3,447,379
In-Kind Donations by CP $ CAD 280,100 312,769 134,015 383,529 84,079
Community & Employee Donations – CP Led $ CAD 820,774 1,055,163 1,493,153 1,367,233 1,930,783
U.S.
Community Investments by CP $ USD 453,606 442,768 475,240 415,086 553,676
Monetary Donations by CP $ USD 426,625 442,768 452,804 415,086 553,676
In-Kind Donations $ USD 26,981 0 22,436 0 0
Community & Employee Donations – CP Led $ USD 304,098 224,297 295,354 303,459 321,261
1 Employee Composition information is specific to CP employees, including Canadian employees of the Central Maine and Québec Railway (“CMQ”) and Transcare.
2 Sr. Executive Management includes all EVP, SVP, VP, AVP, Chief, General Counsel, GM and Managing Director positions.
3 Management includes assistant roadmasters, assistant trainmasters, supervisors and professional specialist positions.
4 Non-management – Non-union includes analyst, coordinator and trainee positions.
5 Non-management – Union is defined as all unionized employees.
6 Other Diversity Metrics is based on self-identification of employee status at CP. Other Diversity data covers CP employees only and is not inclusive of Transcare employees and CMQ Canada employees (acquired in December 2019).
7 Aboriginal is defined as all First Nations, Inuit, Métis and North American Indian peoples. These metrics are not tracked in the U.S.
8 Persons with Disabilities is defined as individuals who have a long-term or recurring physical, mental, sensory, psychiatric or learning impairment and who (a) consider themselves to be disadvantaged in employment by reason of that impairment, or (b) believe that an employer or potential employer is likely to consider them to be disadvantaged in employment by reason of that impairment, and includes persons whose functional limitations owing to their impairment have been accommodated in their current job or workplace.
9 Visible Minorities are defined as persons who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour. Categories in the visible minorities include but are not limited to: Aboriginal (in the U.S.), South Asian, Chinese, Black, Filipino, Latin American, Arab, Southeast Asian, West Asian, Korean and Japanese.
10 New Hire data covers CP employees only and is not inclusive of Transcare employees and CMQ Canada employees (acquired in December 2019).
11 Internal Hires is defined as an existing employee moving to a new position, including all promotions and lateral moves within the Company during the reporting year
12 Turnover data covers CP employees only and is not inclusive of Transcare employees and CMQ Canada employees (acquired in December 2019).
13 Total Employee Turnover refers to the number of workers who left CP during the reporting period. This includes voluntary and non-voluntary terminations. The higher turnover rate from 2015–2016 was primarily due to job reductions as a result of continued strong operational performance and natural attrition.
14 Employee Turnover Rate is calculated as total turnover by employee category divided by the total number of employees in each category.
15 Voluntary Employee Turnover Rate refers to employees who leave the Company of their own volition, and does not include departures due to retirement. Calculated as total voluntary turnover divided by total number of employees.

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